By | 28.05.2019

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Nigerian Scammer Reveals All - A Scam Story #9

AARP is fighting to lower prescription drug prices! He was the answer to her prayers. Before she knew it, her savings were gone. And the man of her dreams? He might not even exist.

Sometimes the scammer will send you valuable items such as laptop computers and mobile phones, and ask you to resend them somewhere. They will invent some reason why they need you to send the goods but this is just a way for them to cover up their criminal activity. Alternatively they may ask you to buy the goods yourself and send them somewhere. You might even be asked to accept money into your bank account and then transfer it to someone else.

Warning - the above scenarios are very likely to be forms of money laundering which is a criminal offence. Never agree to transfer money for someone else. They will tell you they need your money to cover administrative fees or taxes. Scammers may attempt to lure their victims overseas, putting you in dangerous situations that can have tragic consequences. Regardless of how you are scammed, you could end up losing a lot of money.

Nigerian dating scams stories

Online dating and romance scams cheat Australians out of millions every year. The money you send to scammers is almost always impossible to recover and, in addition, you may feel long-lasting emotional betrayal at the hands of someone you thought loved you.

If you think you have been scammed, report it to the website, app, or social media site where the scammer first approached you. If you think you have provided your account details to a scammer, contact your bank or financial institution immediately. We encourage you to report scams to the ACCC via the report a scam page. This helps us to warn people about current scams, monitor trends and disrupt scams where possible.

Please include details of the scam contact you received, for example, email or screenshot. We also provide guidance on protecting yourself from scams and where to get help.

Phishing Phishing scams are attempts by scammers to trick you into giving out your personal information such as your bank account numbers, passwords and credit card numbers. Identity theft is a type of fraud that involves using someone else's identity to steal money or gain other benefits. These scams offer you the false promise of an inheritance to trick you into parting with your money or sharing your bank or credit card details.

Victims tell their stories November 2018

While these scams originated in Nigeria, they now come from all over the world. Skip to Content Skip to Sitemap. Enter a search term. Home Types of scams Listen. How this scam works Warning signs Protect yourself Have you been scammed?

'Are You Real?' Inside an Online Dating Scam

More information Related news From the web. Identity theft Identity theft is a type of fraud that involves using someone else's identity to steal money or gain other benefits. An online reverse image search can show where the pictures came from on the internet. The first three photos Paul sends us don't work, because the meta data has been stripped from the picture.

But we get a result on the fourth, a selfie Paul claims is him in his army uniform. It leads us to the Instagram page of Juan Avalos, a real life marine whose page features the same pictures sent to us by Paul. He has uploaded a warning about catfish because so many fraudsters have been using his photos to scam people.

I run into so many messages, even if I show them it's not me they still don't believe it because they are so deeply in love. For the next few weeks, my producer continues to speak to Paul Richard on the phone as I listen in.

Paul talks gushingly about their future life together and his plans to move to the UK to be with Kathryn once his army service finishes. The conversations grow longer and more frequent, punctuated with kisses, flirtatious comments and a regular request for pictures.

There's just one thing standing in the way of our future happiness - Paul's son is sick and desperately needs medical attention. Catfish need real people to pick up cash for them as some form of identification has to be shown when collecting transactions. Some of these money mules are innocent victims tricked into forwarding on cash, others are in on the scam. We don't know whether Marcy is in on it or not, so we head to Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, where she lives.

Then, just as we think our sting has failed, we receive a notification telling us the cash has been picked up using Marcy's ID. When we ask Marcy what's going on, she claims she's also a victim of our catfish: It was not me, I did not do it. Please find this person. We search through all the Dan Coolmans in Nigeria and we find one who runs a barbershop in Ibadan.

He's using the same number that our catfish has been calling us from. Dan Coolman is another false name, but we discover the phone is registered to Daniel Joseph Okechkwu. We then find a Twitter account with that name and the same profile picture as the one used by Dan Coolman.

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We head for Ibadan, but by the time we get there he's gone. The doors to the barber shop are locked and locals say it's been closed for weeks. There is a photo of our catfish posing with a customer on the side of the building, but no-one seems to know where Daniel Joseph Okechkwu has gone.

After three months of talking to our catfish, we decide to call him and tell him who we really are. Surprisingly, he doesn't hang up straight away. He sticks to his story about being a US soldier and insists his name is Paul Richard. He denies scamming anybody and then ends the call. This time, Daniel Joseph Okechkwu confesses. He claims it's the first romance scam he's ever pulled and that he has been forced to do it because of the closure of his barber shop.

Our catfish says he wants to stop being a romance fraudster. But he needs us to give him money, so that he can afford to stop tricking other people out of their cash. The health secretary announces a plan to tackle a dramatic rise in the use of addictive prescription drugs.

UK selected England N. Image copyright Empics Image caption Catfish victim Roy showing reporter Athar Ahmad conversations he had with someone pretending to be someone else. It's a tough conversation to listen to. Laura Lyons has to break the bad news. More on this story. Bank staff trained to spot cash scams as they take place.

3 comments

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